Back to Historic Cities Main Page
| Historic Cities Main Page | Search By A-Z | Search By Year | Search By MapMaker |

Schedel's maps on our Site




Hartmann Schedel

(1440-1514)

Settled Nuremberg 1484, published Nuremberg Chronicle 1493. First modern map of Germany after Cusanas (Cardinal Cusa) by Hieron. Muntzer. World map& town plans. Schedel's library sold in 1552 to Hans Jacob Fugger.

Schedel's Nuremberg Chronicle must have been one of the most popular of incunables, judging by the number of surviving copies. Some 800 copies of the Latin edition have been traced and 400 of the German. This is not surprising considering that this compilation of sacred and profaned history was the most elaborate printed book of its time, illustrated with more than 1800 woodcuts.

Among these were a number of double-page city views, a folding map of the world and another of northern and central Europe. The text is an amalgam of legend, fancy and tradition interspersed with the occasional scientific fact or authentic piece of modern learning.

Hartmann Schedel, a physician of Nuremberg, was the editor-in-chief; the printer was Anton Koberger, and among the designers the most famous were Michael Wolgemut and Hanns Pleydenwurff, masters of the Nuremberg workshop where Albrecht Durer served his apprenticeship.

The first edition of the Nuremberg Chronicle in July 1493 was in Latin and there was a reprint with German text in December of the same year.





      Sources:

    1. Ronald VereTooley, Tooley's Dictionary of Mapmakers, 1979, N.Y
    2. Cambell Tony, The Earliest Printed Maps 1472-1500, 1987, London
    3. Shirley W Rodney , The mapping of the world; early printed world maps 1472-1700, 1983, London.






Liber chronicarum


Augsburg
Budapest
Cologne
Erfurt
Florence
Genova
Istanbul
Konstanz

Kraków
Lübeck
Magdeburg
München
Nuremberg
Nysa
Prague
Regensburg

Rome
Salzburg
Strasbourg
Ulm
Venice
Wien
Wroclaw